Saudi King, crown prince send best wishes to Pakistan on Independence Day

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A general view of the Metropolitan building illuminated with national flag, ahead of Pakistan's Independence Day in Lahore, Pakistan, on August 13, 2019. (REUTERS/Mohsin Raza)
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Pakistani Prime Minister Imran Khan accompanies Saudi Arabia's Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman on a carriage to the President House in Islamabad, Pakistan February 18, 2019. Press Information Department (PID)/Handout via Reuters
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Pakistan’s Prime Minister Imran Khan is greeted by King Salman in Jeddah in September 2019 as part of Khan’s first state visit overseas. (SPA)
Updated 14 August 2019
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Saudi King, crown prince send best wishes to Pakistan on Independence Day

  • King Salman sends congratulatory cable to President Alvi, crown prince wishes for Pakistan’s “continued health and happiness“
  • UAE ambassador to Pakistan also posts congratulatory post on Twitter for August 14

ISLAMABAD: Saudi King Salman and Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman on Wednesday congratulated Pakistan on its 73rd Independence Day in separate messages, the Saudi state news agency said. 
King Salman sent a congratulatory cable to Pakistani President Dr. Arif Alvi on August 14, Saudi Press Agency reported. The message read: “In our own name and on behalf of the people and government of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, We express to you our best wishes, wishing you continuous health and happiness and the people of the Islamic Republic of Pakistan further progress and prosperity.”
Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman also sent a message of congratulation to President Alvi, saying, “I express to you my best wishes, wishing you continuous health and happiness and the people of the Islamic Republic of Pakistan further progress and prosperity.”
The ambassador to Pakistan of the United Arab Emirates, Hamad Obaid Alzaabi, posted a message of congrats on Twitter, wishing “all friends in Pakistan on the occasion of the Independence Day and for further progress, prosperity, stability, prosperity and development.”
Both the UAE and Saudi Arabia have strong ties with Pakistan and are economic, trading and defense partners.


Jammu and Kashmir: A disputed state under siege 

Updated 22 August 2019
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Jammu and Kashmir: A disputed state under siege 

  • New Delhi fears protests if communication is restored and presence of troops scaled down in Kashmir
  • There is widespread anger and resentment among the people of the disputed region

SRINAGAR: It’s been more than two weeks since Indian administered Kashmir has been facing a security lockdown and prohibitory order. 
Markets in major parts of the Muslim majority region of Jammu and Kashmir are shut amid a communication blackout. 
Kashmiris have been barred from using any form of technology to communicate and denied even a basic phone call.
New Delhi’s decision on August 5 to abrogate two articles of the Indian constitution, Article 370 and 35-A, that gave the disputed state a special autonomous status under the Indian union has brought the Kashmir valley to a standstill.
The Modi administration has imposed strict prohibitor orders, reinforcing parliamentary troops to man each and every nook and corner of the valley.
The administration governing the Kashmiri districts relaxed the prohibitory order on August 19, allowing schools to reopen. It also restored some telephone landlines.
However, protests in some parts of Srinagar and Kashmiri towns forced the government to reimpose the communication ban. 
The schools remain empty days after reopening. 
People are gripped in fear. Uncertainty looms. Reports suggest that grieved communities have resorted to civil disobedience by keeping markets shuttered down and not sending their children to school.
There is widespread anger and resentment among the people. Majority of the Kashmiris feel let down by the government’s decision to strike down the special status passing a rush decree to annex their state without holding a plebiscite.
They say that their identity has been attacked and it’s not possible to live under abject humiliation.
Modi’s government fears large scale protests and resistance if communication is fully restored and the presence of troops is scaled down. 
If violence erupts, New Delhi fears that it stands to lose its political narrative domestically and internationally.
Jammu and Kashmir remains on edge. A disputed state divided between, India and Pakistan but fully claimed by both is under siege on New Delhi’s orders which has violated the UN charter.
It remains to be seen how long the Indian paramilitary forces will be able to contain the growing anger and angst among the local populace of the Muslim-majority region under Indian rule.