Pakistan presents progress report on its anti-poverty development plans to UN

Pakistan has nationally adopted anti-poverty Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) - APP
Updated 17 July 2019
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Pakistan presents progress report on its anti-poverty development plans to UN

  • Says PM Khan is committed to accelerate human development in the country
  • Permanent envoy Maleeha Lodhi is leading Pakistani diplomats in the UN

UNITED NATIONS: Pakistan on Tuesday presented its progress report and future plans on meeting the globally agreed and nationally adopted anti-poverty Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), saying that the government of Prime Minister Imran Khan was committed to accelerating human development in the country.
The progress report was in the form of Voluntary National Review, a mechanism in which countries inform the UN about its implementation strategies to meet the goals and targets of the sustainable development agenda, also known as Agenda 2030.


Islamabad administration invites beggars, trans people to join campaign to ban plastic

Updated 23 August 2019
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Islamabad administration invites beggars, trans people to join campaign to ban plastic

  • Deputy commissioner proposes that marginalized groups sell paper and fabric bags instead of begging on the streets
  • Local government banned the manufacture, sale and distribution of plastic carrier bags last week

ISLAMABAD: The deputy commissioner of Pakistan’s federal capital has invited beggars and transgender persons to sell paper and fabric bags instead of seeking alms around the city, thus helping the Ministry of Climate Change implement its decision to ban plastic bags.
The Islamabad local government banned the manufacture, sale, and distribution of plastic carrier bags last week, on the country’s independence day, as part of Prime Minister Imran Khan’s “Clean, Green Pakistan” campaign.
The new ban follows a three-month-long campaign to raise awareness about the environmental hazards of plastic bags, which can kill wildlife, block drainage systems, collect in waterways and cause other environmental and health problems.
“We have invited transgender people and beggars to sell paper bags – or any type of biodegradable shopping bags – in the city,” Muhammad Hamza Shafqaat, Islamabad’s deputy commissioner, told Arab News on Friday. “We will neither charge them rental or license fee nor impose a fine on them. They can also set up makeshift stalls after informing us at a location of their choice.”
Shafqaat is spearheading the awareness campaign against plastic bags in Islamabad and said involving beggars and transgender persons in the administration’s campaign against plastic would also help them earn a decent living.
“Our local administration’s new policy has widely been welcomed by the public,” the official said. “This is because our aim is also to help these marginalized segments and make them contribute toward a clean and green country.”
Pakistan is on its way to becoming the 128th country in the world that will end the use of non-biodegradable material made from various types of polymers that are harmful to the environment. It is ranked number seven on the index of climate change.
In an interview to Arab News just days before the ban came into effect, State Minister for Climate Change Zartaj Gul said: “We want Pakistan to be plastic-free because it is a burden on our environment.”
She also added that Pakistan wanted to demonstrate to the world that it was “contributing to green initiatives.”