Pakistani court dismisses Musharraf’s plea to adjourn high treason case

In this file photo former President Pervez Musharraf can be seen in a hospital in Dubai. (Photo Courtesy – APML)
Updated 12 June 2019
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Pakistani court dismisses Musharraf’s plea to adjourn high treason case

  • Former military ruler stepped down from power in 2008, was indicted for high treason in March 2014
  • Since 2016 he has lived in self-imposed exile in Dubai where lawyers and aides say he remains seriously ill

ISLAMABAD: A special court on Wednesday rejected a plea by former military ruler General Pervez Musharraf to adjourn hearings in a high treason case against him on account of ill health. 
The retired general, who came to power in a bloodless coup in 1999, is accused of unlawfully suspending the constitution and instituting emergency rule in 2007 at a time when he was in power.
Musharraf denies the charges. He stepped down from power in 2008 amid mass protests and was indicted for high treason in March 2014. In 2016, he was allowed to leave Pakistan for health reasons that his lawyer argued prevented him from standing trial on treason and other charges. 
Earlier this month, media reported that Musharraf was critically ill and had been hospitalized in Dubai. 
“Musharraf is seriously ill and cannot even walk,” Mehrene Adam Malik, the secretary general of Musharraf’s All Pakistan Muslim League (APML) party, said in a message to the media on Wednesday, adding that doctors had advised the retired military official not to travel. “He will come back to Pakistan as soon as his health settles down.”
In March this year, Supreme Court Chief Justice Asif Saeed Khosa had said Musharraf would lose his right of defense in the treason case if he did not appear before a special court on May 2. Musharraf missed that hearing, which was adjourned until after Ramadan, which ended on June 5. 


‘They have crushed our voices’, Kashmiris on not being allowed to pray

Updated 11 min 59 sec ago
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‘They have crushed our voices’, Kashmiris on not being allowed to pray

  • More than 3,000 people have been arrested from different parts of the valley, media reports
  • Most of the big mosques have been shutdown to avoid people amassing for a large congregation

SRINAGAR, Kashmir: A strange silence engulfs Kashmir valley three weeks after the abrogation of the Article 370 that ensured a special autonomous status for Jammu and Kashmir in the Indian union.
This is the silence enforced by the fear of the gun after arrests of a large number of politicians, activists, lawyers, businessmen, and commoners.
“I have been summoned at least four times by the Indian troops and harassed, barring me from offering my prayers. I requested them, explaining that no one indulges in agitation in this area...” Hafiz Altaf Ahmed Shah, an imam at the local mosque told Arab News.
Media reports suggest that more than 3,000 people have been arrested from different parts of the valley and put in special detention centers in the semi-autonomous state or outside.
For those spared or lucky to avoid arrest, a lurking danger looms if they resist – be it a cleric or a professor, male or female, exercising restraint is the only option left.
In Srinagar and outside, most of the big mosques have been shutdown to avoid people amassing for a large congregation – a potential recipe for resistance.
“Our three story mosque is usually at full capacity but today, only 10 to 12 people offered Friday prayers because of the curfew,” Shah said.
Small and medium-sized mosques are under constant vigil. The clerics of these mosques have been ordered to lie low and not lead prayers in their mosques.
“We are being subjected to injustice by the Indian government and the world is aware. But no one is speaking on these issues. They have shut down our communication. They have silenced and crushed our voices,” Shah said.
Watch this exclusive video by Arab News to get a sense of what’s happening in the area.