Ordering in with Lugmety: Zaikaki offers up Indian soul food

Updated 16 May 2019
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Ordering in with Lugmety: Zaikaki offers up Indian soul food

  • The restaurant offers vegetarian and non-vegetarian options
  • The order came with complementary sauces and pickled achar dips

Riyadh: As Ramadan continues, it can get more and more difficult to prepare a home-cooked meal for iftar everyday — especially if you arrive home from work with little time to spare.

I recently caved and ordered in using food delivery app Lugmety because time and energy were in short supply and we needed a hot meal, stat.

After scrolling through the options in my vicinity — the app offers a range of cuisines at a variety of price points — my husband and I settled on Indian food and, with our mouths already watering, selected a few dishes from Zaikaki, which offers both vegetarian and non-vegetarian meals.

Our food arrived with time to spare and the packaging kept everything piping hot.

We especially liked the meat samosas, an Indian puff pastry stuffed with fresh ground lamb meat and potato — it was the perfect start to our meal.

We then moved on to the murgh paneer angar with its marinated boneless chicken breasts in a fragrant pot of yoghurt, red chili and cottage cheese. The dish was extremely juicy, tender and moist.

The butter chicken, cooked in mild spices with a rich tomato-based gravy and crushed cashew nuts, was another winner and we were even able to customize our order on the app, which offers you the ability to choose an option of chicken, beef or prawns.

If you prefer things on the spicy side, the bhuna ghosht is a fiery meat dish with a not-so-subtle kick of character, courtesy of its chilies.

Indian cuisine needs a superb base — be it rice or naan, you cannot spoon down such intense flavors without a delicious plate-to-mouth vehicle as it were.

In my household, a traditional plain biryani is a must. The restaurant’s basmati rice garnished with coriander, spices and nuts pairs perfectly with any curry. And because we were feeling decadent, we topped it all off with a hot butter naan, with just a hint of salt and the ideal crunchy-to-soft ratio.

The restaurant also sent complementary sauces and pickled achar dips, which we mopped up with the naan long after the mains had disappeared.


What We Are Reading Today: Democratic Equality by James Lindley Wilson

Updated 17 August 2019
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What We Are Reading Today: Democratic Equality by James Lindley Wilson

  • It mounts a bold and persuasive defense of democracy as a way of making collective decisions

Democracy establishes relationships of political equality, ones in which citizens equally share authority over what they do together and respect one another as equals. 

But in today’s divided public square, democracy is challenged by political thinkers who disagree about how democratic institutions should be organized, and by antidemocratic politicians who exploit uncertainties about what democracy requires and why it matters. 

Democratic Equality mounts a bold and persuasive defense of democracy as a way of making collective decisions, showing how equality of authority is essential to relating equally as citizens, says a review on the Princeton University Press website.

James Lindley Wilson explains why the US Senate and Electoral College are urgently in need of reform, why proportional representation is not a universal requirement of democracy, how to identify racial vote dilution and gerrymandering in electoral districting, how to respond to threats to democracy posed by wealth inequality, and how judicial review could be more compatible with the democratic ideal.