‘French Spiderman’ climbs Paris skyscraper harness-free

French climber Alain Robert, lower right, managed to scale the same skyscraper in La Defense business district in 2016. (AFP)
Updated 25 March 2019
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‘French Spiderman’ climbs Paris skyscraper harness-free

  • Climb was done to help to raise funds for the renovation of Notre-Dame cathedral
  • Robert has climbed more than 100 structures including the Golden Gate Bridge in San Francisco and Burj al Khalifa in Dubai

PARIS: Dubbed the “French Spiderman,” Alain Robert scaled a skyscraper in Paris on Friday without a harness to raise funds for the renovation of Notre-Dame cathedral.
Television images showed the 56-year-old using horizontal struts running up the Engie headquarters’ curved facade and a protruding structure going top-to-bottom of the 185-meter glass-fronted building in La Defense business district
Robert halted regularly to chalk his hands.
He was arrested shortly after completing the climb.
“Because there’s no money left in the government coffers, the cathedral is falling into disrepair,” he said ahead of the climb. His sponsors were writing a cheque of €5,000 ($5,650) to help finance the renovations, he added.
During the stunt, bystanders at the bottom pointed smartphones toward clear blue skies as wispy clouds raced overheard in blustery winds.
Robert has climbed more than 100 structures including the Golden Gate Bridge in San Francisco and Burj al Khalifa in Dubai, as well as the same tower in Paris in 2016.
The Archbishop of Paris is on a drive to raise more than €100 million to save Notre-Dame’s crumbling gargoyles and gothic arches.


Rwanda’s rhino population grows, tourists expected to increase

Updated 25 June 2019
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Rwanda’s rhino population grows, tourists expected to increase

  • There are only about 1,000 black rhinos left in the wild, Jes Gruner, the Akagera National Park manager, said
  • In 2017 tourism earned Rwanda $437 million

KIGALI: Rhino keepers who successfully delivered five endangered black rhinos to Rwanda spent months hugging and coddling them inside their transport boxes to prepare them for the journey, a rhino handler said as the animals were freed on Monday.
The two male and three female eastern black rhinoceroses were flown from Safari Park Dour Kralove zoo in the Czech Republic, where they had been getting to know each other after arriving from separate European parks.
“The preparation process took several months. It started in autumn last year when two animals were brought here from Denmark and England. They started to bond, which always takes weeks because black rhinos are very alert and nervous animals,” said rhino handler Jaromir Sejnoha from the Dvur Kralove Safari Park.
“In the final phase (of preparations) the rhino is trained to stay inside the box for several minutes. We feed them and hug them in there, so they aren’t scared of the box and become accustomed to it, and so on the day of transportation they don’t get nervous and the whole transportation goes smoothly.”
There are only about 1,000 black rhinos left in the wild, Jes Gruner, the Akagera National Park manager, said. The new arrivals mean Rwanda is home to 25 of them.
Tourism is a key foreign exchange earner in the East African nation, home to mountain gorillas and the so-called “Big Five” African game animals — lions, rhinos, elephants, buffalo, and leopard.
“Every year our tourism numbers are going up and bringing these rhinos I am sure will help,” Gruner said.
The park received 44,000 visitors who generated over $2 million last year, Gruner said.
In 2017 tourism earned Rwanda $437 million. Clare Akamanzi, chief executive of the Rwanda Development Board, said 2018 numbers were not yet ready due to a change of methodology.
The push for tourist dollars in not without controversy. The government’s 2018 deal to pay British football club Arsenal £30 million ($38 million) to have “Visit Rwanda” emblazoned on the team’s jersey was criticized by politicians in some donor nations who questioned whether it was a good use of money by a government still heavily dependent on foreign aid.