No further US waivers on Iran oil sanctions: official

Oil tankers pass through the Strait of Hormuz. (Reuters)
Updated 12 January 2019
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No further US waivers on Iran oil sanctions: official

  • US Special Representative for Iran Brian Hook made the comments at a news conference in Abu Dhabi
  • Washington has given waivers to eight traditional Iranian oil buyers

ABU DHABI: US Special Representative for Iran Brian Hook said on Saturday Washington was not looking to grant any more waivers for Iranian oil after the reimposition of US sanctions.
Hook told a news conference in the United Arab Emirates capital Abu Dhabi that the reason for the earlier waivers was to prevent a spike in oil prices. He declined to say what the administration in Washington would do when the current waivers end in May.
Washington gave waivers to eight traditional Iranian oil buyers — including China, India, Japan and South Korea — after reimposing sanctions on Iranian oil in November.


US trade negotiators to visit China for fresh round of talks

Updated 21 March 2019
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US trade negotiators to visit China for fresh round of talks

  • Washington and Beijing are battling over the final shape of a trade deal
  • American officials are demanding profound changes to Chinese industrial policy

BEIJING: US Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer and Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin will visit China on March 28-29 for a fresh round of talks aimed at resolving the bruising trade war, the Chinese commerce ministry said Thursday.
After their visit, Chinese Vice Premier Liu He will head to the United States in April to continue the negotiations, ministry spokesman Gao Feng said at a press briefing.
Washington and Beijing are battling over the final shape of a trade deal, with American officials demanding profound changes to Chinese industrial policy.
President Donald Trump warned Wednesday that US tariffs on Chinese imports could remain in place for a “substantial period,” dampening hopes that an agreement would see them lifted soon.
Over the last eight months, the United States and China have slapped tariffs on more than $360 billion in two-way goods trade, weighing on the manufacturing sectors in both countries.
On Friday, China’s rubber-stamp parliament approved a foreign investment law to strengthen protections for intellectual property — a central US grievance — but critics said the bill was rammed through without sufficient time for input from businesses.