What We Are Reading Today: Microeconomics for Managers

Updated 11 January 2019
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What We Are Reading Today: Microeconomics for Managers

Author: David M. Kreps

This is a thoroughly revised and substantially streamlined new edition of a leading textbook that shows MBA students how understanding economics can help them make smarter and better-informed real-world management decisions. David Kreps, one of the world’s most influential economists, has developed and refined Microeconomics for Managers over decades of teaching at Stanford’s Graduate School of Business. Stressing game theory and strategic thinking and driven by in-depth, integrated case studies, the book shows future managers how economics can provide practical answers to critical business problems, says a review on the Princeton University Press website.
It focuses on case studies and real companies, such as Amazon, Microsoft, General Motors, United Airlines, and Xerox. It covers essential topics for future managers — including price discrimination, Porter’s five forces, risk sharing and spreading, signalling and screening, credibility and reputation, and economics and organizational behavior.


What We Are Reading Today: 99 Variations on a Proof by Philip Ording

Updated 24 January 2019
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What We Are Reading Today: 99 Variations on a Proof by Philip Ording

  • Book draws unexpected connections to everything from mysticism and technology to architecture and sign language.

 

This book offers a multifaceted perspective on mathematics by demonstrating 99 different proofs of the same theorem.

Each chapter solves an otherwise unremarkable equation in distinct historical, formal, and imaginative styles that range from medieval, topological, and doggerel to chromatic, electrostatic, and psychedelic.

With a rare blend of humor and scholarly aplomb, Philip Ording weaves these variations into an accessible and wide-ranging narrative on the nature and practice of mathematics, according to a review on the Princeton University Press website.

Inspired by the experiments of the Paris-based writing group known as the Oulipo — whose members included Raymond Queneau, Italo Calvino, and Marcel Duchamp — Ording explores new ways to examine the aesthetic possibilities of mathematical activity.

99 Variations on a Proof is a mathematical take on Queneau’s Exercises in Style, a collection of 99 retellings of the same story, and it draws unexpected connections to everything from mysticism and technology to architecture and sign language.