Tribesmen ask US to compensate families for loss of life and property

1 / 6
Tribesmen in Jamrud, the main town in Khyber tribal district, hold a grand Jirga (grand tribal council), demanding the US to compensate them for damage to their properties and using their routes as lines of communication. The tribesmen also seek blood money for those who were killed in attacks on NATO supplies. (AN photo)
2 / 6
A tribal elder addresses tribesmen’s grand Jirga (grand tribal council) in Jamrud, a town in Khyber tribal district, demanding the US to compensate them for damage to their properties and using their routes as lines of communication. The tribesmen also seek blood money for those who were killed in attacks on NATO supplies. (AN photo)
3 / 6
Tribesmen attend a grand Jirga (grand tribal council) in Jamrud, the main town in Khyber tribal district. The tribesmen demand the US to compensate them for damages to their properties and using their routes as line of communications. They are also seeking blood money for those killed in attacks on NATO supplies. (AN photo)
4 / 6
A tribesman addresses a grand Jirga (grand tribal council) in Jamrud, the main town in Khyber tribal district. The tribesmen demand the US to compensate them for damage to their properties and using their routes as line of communications. They are also seeking blood money for those killed in attacks on NATO supplies. (AN photo)
5 / 6
A tribal elder addresses tribesmen’s grand Jirga (grand tribal council) in Jamrud, a town in Khyber tribal district, demanding the US to compensate them for damage to their properties and using their routes as lines of communication. The tribesmen also seek blood money for those who were killed in attacks on NATO supplies. (AN photo)
6 / 6
A tribal elder addresses tribesmen’s grand Jirga (grand tribal council) in Jamrud, a town in Khyber tribal district, demanding the US to compensate them for damage to their properties and using their routes as lines of communication. The tribesmen also seek blood money for those who were killed in attacks on NATO supplies. (AN photo)
Updated 27 December 2018
0

Tribesmen ask US to compensate families for loss of life and property

  • Elders from several districts in Pakistan insist they will continue their fight for legitimate rights
  • Maintain that the region was destroyed after Washington’s invasion of Afghanistan

PESHAWAR: US President Donald Trump’s announcement to withdraw half of his troops from Afghanistan has prompted the tribesmen of a region in Pakistan to seek compensation from Washington for loss of life, damage to property, and for using their land routes as lines of communication.
Several also demanded that the administration pay blood money for those killed in attacks on NATO trucks.
The comments follow US media’s reports which claimed that 7,000 troops, nearly half of those remaining in Afghanistan, could go home within months.
Tribal elders, officials, and members from the youth fraternity attended a grand jirga (tribal council) in Jamrud, the main town in the Khyber tribal district, demanding compensation from the US for the losses incurred in terms of life and property during the past 17 years of the war in Afghanistan.
An enraged Malik Dawood Shah, a tribal elder, told Arab News that the reason for them to seek compensation now was because earlier the tribal people were entangled in a host of problems —  amid a mass exodus of families — due to Pakistan’s military action against insurgents and, therefore, had no time to voice their demands back then.
“We had a pile of issues to deal with during the past several years and had no time to unite or raise our voice. Now as the tribal people are settled or repatriated to their hometowns after years of displacement, we got united and now we will demand our due rights. Let’s not forget that we suffered because of the US supply to Afghanistan,” Shah said.
He added that his fellow tribesmen and elders from all seven districts, formerly known as Federally Administered Tribal Areas (FATA), would launch a massive awareness campaign to unite people for the initiative, for those killed during attacks on NATO convoys or damages done to “our routes and properties”.
However, he added, if the government of Pakistan tried to create hurdles in the seeking of their legitimate rights, then the tribesmen would have “no option but to demand the same from the government of Pakistan”.
“We will go to every extent to get our due rights. Enough is enough. I am even willing to die for this cause, but I will go ahead with my demands,” he said, adding that the next meeting would be held in the Mohmand tribal district to strengthen their alliance.
Several of the elders speaking on the occasion expressed dissatisfaction at the decision to merge FATA with the Khyber Pakhtunkhwa (KP) province, demanding a separate province instead. 
“Father of our nation, Quaid-e-Azam Muhammad Ali Jinnah had promised us that FATA will be a tax-free zone and our culture, norms, and traditions will be protected. However, the government has trampled all those pledges and announced its merger with KP without taking us into confidence,” Malik Salahuddin Afridi, another tribal elder from Khyber tribal district, told Arab News.
Afridi alleged that the entire tribal belt had experienced mayhem and turmoil because of the arrival of US forces in Afghanistan and now it was the responsibility of Washington to clear the mess “it was leaving behind”.
“With the arrival of the US forces, we had an influx of militants. We had our routes and properties damaged and lost hundreds of tribesmen due to the NATO’s supply to Afghanistan. Hence, our demand for compensation is legitimate and we will press for our demands,” Afridi said.
He said that the entire tribal people would be mobilized to build pressure on the US to compensate them for their losses. “We are chalking out our future strategy. We are mulling over whether to close the main route in Khyber leading to the Torkham border or to approach the Supreme Court of Pakistan or any other option to pressure the US to compensate them,” he added.
Malik Bismillah Khan, another tribal elder, said that almost all families had lost at least one family member in the US’ war on terror.
“We firmly believe this time that all stakeholders, specifically the US, want to end the Afghan war because Washington can’t afford to keep on fighting in this conflict. Prior to leaving Afghanistan, we want Washington to compensate tribal people. Or else, we will launch a series of protests in favor of our legitimate demands,” he observed.


China calls for de-escalation of tensions in South Asia

Updated 19 March 2019
0

China calls for de-escalation of tensions in South Asia

  • FM Qureshi is visiting Beijing to attend the strategic dialogue between the two countries
  • China applauded Pakistan’s counterterrorism efforts

ISLAMABAD: China’s Foreign Minister Wang Yi on Tuesday called for de-escalation of tensions in South Asia and emphasized the need for dialogue to resolve all outstanding dispute in the region, said an official handout circulated by Pakistan’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs on Tuesday.

China’s top diplomat made the statement during his conversation with Foreign Minister Shah Mehmood Qureshi, who is currently visiting Beijing to attend the China-Pakistan Strategic Dialogue.

“The two sides reaffirmed support to each other on all core issues of their national interest,” the handout read. “They underlined that state sovereignty and territorial integrity are cardinal principles of UN Charter and international law.”

Discussing the situation in Afghanistan, both leaders expressed support for the ongoing efforts for peace and reconciliation in that country, reiterating “support for Afghan-owned Afghan-led inclusive peace process and called on all stakeholders in Afghanistan to become part of an intra-Afghan dialogue.”

China and Pakistan also agreed to continue their mutual collaboration and reaffirmed their commitment to the economic corridor between Gwadar and Xinjiang as they pledged to work for the smooth implementation of the project, especially its Special Economic Zones.

“While rejecting the negative propaganda against CPEC, they expressed a strong resolve to safeguard [it] from all kinds of threats,” Pakistan’s official statement said.

The two sides also agreed to increase cooperation against terrorism by strengthening communication and coordination in different areas of importance. “The Chinese side highly appreciated Pakistan’s commitment and efforts to counter terrorism,” the handout read, adding: “Foreign Minister of Pakistan expressed appreciation for Chinese support for Pakistan’s efforts.”