Minister: Saudi Arabia’s judiciary enjoys full autonomy to deal with Khashoggi case

Saudi Arabia's Justice Minister Waleed Al-Samaani. (SPA)
Updated 21 October 2018
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Minister: Saudi Arabia’s judiciary enjoys full autonomy to deal with Khashoggi case

  • The justice minister explained the directives and decisions ordered by King Salman
  • Dr. Al-Samaani also said that the administration of justice is the permanent approach of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

RIYADH: Saudi Arabia's judiciary enjoys full autonomy to deal with the case of Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi, the Kingdom's Justice Minister Dr. Waleed Al-Samaani said in a statement issued by state news agency SPA on Saturday.

He added that the Khashoggi case took place on Saudi sovereign territory and it will be looked at by Saudi courts when all procedures are complete.

Dr. Al-Samaani also said that the administration of justice is the permanent approach of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, and that the Kingdom will not deviate from this approach.

Saudi Arabia’s judicial institution was founded upon the principles of Islamic law and values of justice that order fairness, Dr. Al-Samaani said. He continued by saying that King Salman and Crown Prince Mohammed fully support Saudi judicial institutions that aim to prevent harm to the Kingdom or its citizens, wherever they may be. 

The justice minister explained that the directives and decisions ordered by King Salman, in the wake of the unfortunate and tragic event that led to Khashoggi’s death, are a continuation of the Kingdom’s approach to “establish the foundations of justice, according to our tolerant law, and the leadership's keenness to protect the safety of all its citizens and care for them wherever they are.”

He said: “We, as Saudi citizens, are proud of our mandate, who have spared no effort in caring for the homeland and the citizens of this blessed country.”

The Minister of Justice added that the Kingdom is steadfast in its justice and will not be destabilized by any hostile behaviors, including reckless media outlets that lack professionalism and credibility.

Meanwhile, Chairman of the Human Rights Commission, Bandar Al-Aiban, affirmed that the directives issued by King Salman to uncover the circumstances of Khashoggi’s disappearance, which led to the disclosure of his demise and the subsequent detention of suspects as part of the investigations.
This included the subsequent detention of a number of suspects and the dismissal of a number of officials, which is aimed at achieving justice and accountability of those involved in this case, including the perpetrators.
He added that justice will be applied with full rigor and transparency.
The formation of a ministerial committee, under the chairmanship of Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, to restructure the General Intelligence Presidency, falls in line with efforts to consolidate the foundations of justice in accordance with Islamic law and to protect the security and safety of all citizens and residents in the Kingdom, and to ensure the safety of its citizens at home and abroad.
“These orders and measures unequivocally affirm that the protection of human rights, in accordance with the provisions of Islamic law and regulations is one of the most important priorities of the state. The judiciary will have the final say in achieving justice and bringing those involved to a fair trial,” he said.
Dr. Al-Aiban offered the deepest condolences to the family of the deceased.

 


Houthis agree to stop firing missiles at Saudi Arabia

Updated 19 November 2018
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Houthis agree to stop firing missiles at Saudi Arabia

  • The Iran-backed rebels ordered the cessation of rocket and drone attacks
  • It cessation was done at the request of UN special envoy Martin Griffiths

SANAA, Yemen: A senior leader of the Houthi militia says the group will halt rocket fire into Saudi Arabia for the sake of peace efforts.
The Houthi leader, Mohammed Ali Al-Houthi, says the Iran-backed rebels ordered the cessation of rocket and drone attacks on the Saudis and forces loyal to coalition member the United Arab Emirates at the request of UN special envoy Martin Griffiths.
The statement was carried by militia-controlled media early on Monday.
Griffiths announced on Friday that both sides had agreed to attend talks in Sweden “soon” aimed at ending the three-year war. The announcement followed an informal de-escalation last week around the key port city of Hodeidah.