London Fashion Week kicks off declaring itself fur-free

British luxury fashion group Burberry has stopped burning unsold products and will no longer use real fur and angora in its clothes, chief executive Marco Gobbetti revealed on September 6, 2018. (File/AFP)
Updated 14 September 2018
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London Fashion Week kicks off declaring itself fur-free

LONDON: London Fashion Week kicked off on Friday, declaring itself fur-free for the first time as an increasing number of designers seek to better their green credentials.
The five-day trade event, the second leg of the month-long spring/summer 2019 catwalk season, has fewer big names than New York, Milan and Paris but draws buyers, journalists and bloggers from around the world for its emerging talent and established brands such as Burberry, Christopher Kane and Erdem.
According to a survey by the British Fashion Council (BFC), no animal fur will feature on the London catwalks or in designer presentations this season.
"We ask every season whether fur will be represented on the catwalk or in presentations...This is the first time that designers have said that there will be 100 percent no fur on the catwalk," BFC Chief Executive Caroline Rush told Reuters.
"I think it just reflects a change in their creative choices and the power of the consumer and really thinking about the images that they're putting out through fashion week."
Burberry last week said it would no longer use real fur, the latest fashion house to ditch animal skin amid growing pressure from animal rights groups and younger clients' changing tastes. Other labels turning their back on fur include Italian luxury labels Versace and Gucci.
"Of the big four (fashion capitals), (London) is certainly the first that can say that we'll be 100 percent fur free this time," Rush added.
Getting the ball rolling with a bold and colourful show, designer Richard Malone chose hot pink, mustard yellow and sharp blues and greens for his edgy collection which appeared to draw on 1960s-1980s influences.
Models strutted in light jackets with exaggerated shoulders, tasselled mini-skirts and narrow over-the-knee biker shorts worn with chunky platform boots. Printed tops featured the face of a stranger in a crowd, according to show notes.
Asked to describe the line, Malone said it was "bossy and fun ... like fun for a women to wear, and also quite powerful for a women to wear."
The women's clothing market grew by 3.2 percent to 28.4 billion pounds ($37.26 billion) last year in Britain, according to market research firm Mintel, and sales are forecast to increase to 33.5 billion pounds in 2022.
Among the highlights this season is Victoria Beckham who is celebrating 10 years in fashion by bringing her catwalk show to London from New York, and the first collection by Burberry's new chief creative officer Riccardo Tisci.


Lebanese designers take over Los Angeles awards show... again

Updated 20 November 2018
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Lebanese designers take over Los Angeles awards show... again

DUBAI: The red carpet at the annual Governors Awards in Hollywood was awash with Middle Eastern gowns as the likes of Rashida Jones, Michelle Yeoh and Lily Collins chose to wear creations by Lebanese designers — proving that the region’s fashion stars are as popular as ever with the who’s who of the film industry.
British-American actress Collins, who starred in 2017’s “To the Bone,” chose a gown by Georges Chakra, with a sparkling purple skirt and off-the-shoulder black bodice for Sunday night’s event in Los Angeles.

(AFP)


Meanwhile, “Parks and Recreation” actress Jones went for a sunset orange kaftan with a peek-a-boo cut out and silver detailing at the neckline by Reem Acra.

(AFP)


For her part, Yeoh, who starred in blockbuster hit “Crazy Rich Asians,” wore an ice blue, figure-hugging gown by Elie Saab, complete with cutouts on the heavily beaded bodice.

(AFP)


The event honoring the careers of film industry legends Tyson, Levy and composer Lalo Schifrin brought some of Hollywood’s biggest names — Oprah, Tom Hanks, Steven Spielberg, Quincy Jones, Harrison Ford and Clint Eastwood among them — to the Ray Dolby Ballroom in the heart of Hollywood to reminisce, laugh and schmooze without the pressure, as Hanks said, of “being nervous about who is going to win.”
The Governors Awards celebrate the careers of a few entertainment veterans who have not yet won an Academy Award by bestowing them with an honorary Oscar statuette. Recipients are voted on by the board of governors of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences.
For the 93-year-old Tyson, it was a half lifetime coming. It had been 45 years since her first and only nomination, for “Sounder” in 1972.
“This is a culmination of all those years of haves and have nots,” Tyson said, noting that she’ll be turning 94 next month.
The private, untelevised dinner gala at the Hollywood & Highland complex has also become an important stop on the campaign trail to the Academy Awards for some of the year’s awards hopefuls, making the event one of the most star-studded of the season. In a spin around the room, The Associated Press saw Nicole Kidman chatting with “First Man” director Damien Chazelle, Disney CEO Bob Iger leaving his seat next to Ford to meet Lady Gaga, “Eighth Grade” director Bo Burnham and “Roma” director Alfonso Cuaron deep in conversation, Hanks and Rita Wilson stopping to greet Melissa McCarthy, John Krasinski and Emily Blunt saying hello to Hilary Swank, the cast of “Black Panther” posing for a photo with Marvel chief Kevin Feige and Lin-Manuel Miranda hanging out with the “Crazy Rich Asians” cast and, later, Jonah Hill.
But all turned their full attention to the stage and the titans being honored when the time came. For while the event may be in its 10th year, and the honorary Oscar itself in its 60th, there was still room for a few firsts. Levy became the first member of the public relations branch of the film academy to win an honorary Oscar, while Kennedy became the first woman to win the prestigious Irving G. Thalberg Memorial award — an honor that she shared with her husband and partner Marshall.