Shooting in Fredericton, Canada leaves 4 dead – including two police officers

Emergency vehicles are seen at the Brookside Drive area in Fredericton, Canada. (Reuters)
Updated 10 August 2018
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Shooting in Fredericton, Canada leaves 4 dead – including two police officers

  • One suspect is in custody after the shooting in Fredericton, New Brunswick
  • Fredericton police are asking residents to avoid Brookside Drive area as incident is ongoing

FREDERICTON, New Brunswick: Four people, including two police officers, were killed in a shooting in the eastern Canadian city of Fredericton and one person was taken into custody, police said on Friday.

Fredericton police are asking residents to avoid the area and stay in their homes. The circumstances of the shooting are unclear, but police said on Twitter that the “incident is ongoing.”
They were also asking people on Facebook not to use social media to report on police locations. 

Gun laws in Canada are more strict than in the United States but a proliferation of weapons has led to an increase in gun crimes in recent years.
“Awful news coming out of Fredericton,” Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said on Twitter. “My heart goes out to everyone affected by this morning’s shooting. We’re following the situation closely.”

David MacCoubrey, who lives in Fredericton, said he heard about 20 shots in total.
He awoke in his apartment on Brookside Drive around 7 a.m. local time to the sound of gunshots 33 feet (10 meters) away.
MacCoubrey said his apartment complex has four buildings in a square, and it sounded like the shots were coming from the middle of the complex.
He said police have been searching the complex, and he’s been sitting away from windows.

Fredericton, a city of about 56,000, is the capital of the province of New Brunswick.

Three Royal Canadian Mounted Police officers were killed and two more were wounded in 2014 in Moncton, New Brunswick.

 

 


US women detained for speaking Spanish sue border agency

In this Wednesday, Jan. 23, 2019, photo provided by the ACLU of Montana, Martha Hernandez, left, and Ana Suda pose in front of a convenience store in Havre, Mont., where they say they were detained by a U.S Border Patrol agent for speaking Spanish last year. (AP)
Updated 17 min 29 sec ago
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US women detained for speaking Spanish sue border agency

  • The American Civil Liberties Union on Thursday filed suit against US Customs and Border Protection on behalf of the women, who live in Havre

LOS ANGELES: Two US women detained by a border patrol agent in the state of Montana after he heard them speaking Spanish in a grocery store have sued the country’s border protection agency.
Video of the incident — which took place last May in the small town of Havre — showed Agent Paul O’Neal tell Ana Suda and Martha Hernandez that he had asked to see their identification as it was unusual to hear Spanish speakers in the state, which borders Canada.
“It has to do with you guys speaking Spanish in the store in a state where it’s predominately English speaking,” he said.
“It’s not illegal, it’s just very unheard of up here,” he told the women.
The American Civil Liberties Union on Thursday filed suit against US Customs and Border Protection on behalf of the women, who live in Havre.
Suda and Hernandez say in the lawsuit that O’Neal detained them for 40 minutes.
California native Hernandez and Suda, who was born in Texas, said they were standing in line to buy milk and eggs when the agent — who was standing behind them — commented on Hernandez’s accent, and asked the women where they were born.
“I asked, ‘Are you serious’?” Suda said, according to the lawsuit. “Agent O’Neal responded that he was ‘dead serious’.”
The two women say they were then asked to show identification and questioned outside the store, before eventually being released.
“The incident itself is part of a broader pattern that we’ve seen of abusive tactics by border patrol which has gotten worse since the Trump administration, which has left border patrol officers feeling emboldened to take actions like this,” Cody Wofsy, an attorney with the ACLU, told AFP.
“This has been devastating for (Suda and Hernandez),” he added.
“Havre is a small town, they felt ostracized and humiliated and made to feel unwelcome in their own town and in their own country.”
He noted the United States has no official language, with Spanish by far the most common language spoken after English.
A Customs and Border Protection spokesman declined to comment on the case.
“As a matter of policy, US Customs and Border Protection does not comment on pending litigation,” he told AFP in a statement. “However, lack of comment should not be construed as agreement or stipulation with any of the allegations.”