China to provide $14M for rebuilding of damaged schools in tribal districts

In this file photo, schoolboys hold national flags outside a girls and boys school in the mountainous area of the Jhanda tribal district of Mohmand Hills on June 1, 2011. (AAMIR QURESHI/AFP)
Updated 10 August 2018
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China to provide $14M for rebuilding of damaged schools in tribal districts

  • The agreement covers government schools in the Bara division of Khyber Agency
  • The Chinese Ambassador to Islamabad, Yao Jing, promised future support to Pakistan in all areas

ISLAMABAD: China signed an agreement with Pakistan in Islamabad on Thursday to help repair and rebuild damaged government schools in the Bara division of Khyber Agency.
The Chinese authorities will provide $14 million under the agreement, according to the Associated Press of Pakistan (APP), which will be used to reconstruct 68 damaged schools to improve the education infrastructure in the area and enroll more students.
Khyber Agency is part of the former Federally Administered Tribal Area. Much of the infrastructure in the region was destroyed in recent years as the country battled a rising tide of violent extremism in its volatile northwestern territories. As Pakistan’s security forces fought militant groups of various ideologies, members of radical groups frequently targeted schools and other educational facilities, particularly girls’ schools.
With the security situation gradually improving across the country, the authorities are trying to address development issues in a region that was previously infested with militants, and prepare the inhabitants for more peaceful and secure lives.
The Chinese Ambassador to Islamabad Yao Jing applauded Islamabad’s efforts to accelerate economic growth and promised further support in the future to administrations in all parts of the country.
Beijing and Islamabad are already working on the multi-billion-dollar China-Pakistan Economic Corridor, which is considered one of the most significant projects being carried out under the “one belt and one road” Initiative.


King Salman holds bilateral talks with Alvi

Updated 12 December 2018
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King Salman holds bilateral talks with Alvi

  • Both leaders reviewed matters of mutual interest, including trade ties and investment opportunities
  • President welcomed Kingdom's initiative to increase Pakistani pilgrims' quota to 5,000

ISLAMABAD: Saudi Arabia’s King Salman bin Abdulaziz received Pakistan's President Arif Alvi at the Yamama palace in Riyadh on Wednesday, a statement released by the president’s office read.
During the meeting, the two leaders discussed matters of mutual interest, bilateral ties, trade, investment, and economic relations.
Pakistan’s acting ambassador in Riyadh, Zeeshan Ahmed, and consul general in Jeddah, Sheheryar Akbar Khan also accompanied the president in the meeting.
President Alvi was received by the governor of Riyadh, Prince Faisal bin Bandar when he arrived in the capital from Madinah.
The president reached Saudi Arabia on Sunday to perform Umrah, marking his first visit to the Kingdom since assuming office in September this year.
Saudi Ambassador to Pakistan, Nawaf bin Saeed Al-Malki also accompanied the president on his journey.

Meanwhile, Pakistan’s Press Information Department (PID) tweeted on Wednesday that the Minister for Religious Affairs, Noor ul Haq Qadri -- who is also in Saudi Arabia to perform Umrah -- met with President Alvi in Madinah and briefed him about the ongoing talks with the Saudi authorities pertaining to the Hajj agreements.
“President welcomed additional 5,000 quota for Pakistani pilgrims granted by Saudi govt,” a statement released by the PID read.
On Monday, both Pakistan and Saudi Arabia signed an agreement to increase the annual Hajj quota for Pakistan in 2019.
Targeting an increase of 5,000 pilgrims next year, authorities said nearly 184,210 Pakistanis will be able to perform Hajj.
Pakistan and Saudi Arabia enjoy close bilateral relations, with historic trade ties and religious affinity providing a strong basis of trust between the two countries.