Bella and Sonia shine at Cannes charity show

Naomi Campbell (C), Bella Hadid (2ndL) and Winnie Harlow (Rear C-R) took part in the show. (AFP)
Updated 14 May 2018
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Bella and Sonia shine at Cannes charity show

  • The annual charity show saw celebrities from across the world join Campbell at the bash, including US-Palestinian model Bella Hadid, Tunisian beauty Sonia Ben Ammar
  • This year, proceeds from the event will go to the Time’s Up movement, as well as Save The Children

DUBAI: British supermodel Naomi Campbell hosted the 13th Fashion for Relief event on the sidelines of this year’s Cannes Film Festival in southern France on Sunday night.

The annual charity show saw celebrities from across the world join Campbell at the bash, including US-Palestinian model Bella Hadid, Tunisian beauty Sonia Ben Ammar, Canadian model Winnie Harlow and French-Algerian actress Farida Khelfa.

This year, proceeds from the event will go to the Time’s Up movement, as well as Save The Children.

“This year’s proceeds will enable Save the Children to provide life-saving food, shelter and medical treatment to children around the world, including those who have been affected by the conflict in Syria,” the charity stated on its events page.

Hadid, Harlow and Campbell took to the catwalk in a colorful array of outfits, including a rainbow-colored dress bedecked in pompoms, which Harlow rocked with aplomb.

The stars weren’t just on the runway, they filled out the crowd too, with the likes of The Weeknd, Michelle Rodriguez, Paris Hilton and Carla Bruni all taking their seats to enjoy the show.

Hadid walked the red carpet prior to the show in a custom Julien Macdonald dress that was covered in sparkling black sequins.

Industry heavyweight Campbell even hinted that it might soon be time to hang up her heels, telling the Daily Mail that she may bow out in the coming years.

 “I don’t know if I can walk much longer, it’s been 32 years,” the 47-year-old told the newspaper.

 “But it’s an honor to walk… I’d love for it to be carried on by the younger generation and for me to sit in the audience and watch.”

It is, perhaps, fitting that part of the proceeds from the show will go to the Time’s Up movement as the 71st Cannes Film Festival has taken on a decidedly female air this year, with a bevy of women-driven films gaining attention, as well as various calls for equality in the film industry being made during the event.

Mexican-American actress Salma Hayek, a vocal campaigner against sexual harassment in the movie industry, said on Sunday male stars should get less pay as way to even things up with chronically underpaid women, Reuters reported.

A day after joining dozens of other female movie makers, including Jane Fonda and Cate Blanchett, at a demonstration at the Cannes Film Festival in support of the struggle for women's rights, Hayek told a conference

"The actors have to say: 'OK, time’s up. I had a good run but now it’s also time to be generous with the actresses in the films.'

"We all have to be part of the adjustment. That’s one idea. I’m going to be hated for it. I hope I can get a job after this!"

The issue of equality has been a running theme throughout the film festival which is the first to take place since sexual harassment allegations against some major Hollywood players surfaced last year

The Cannes Film Festival runs from May 8 to May 19.

Decoder

Time's Up

Time's Up is the Hollywood-driven movement against sexual harassment that was founded on January 1, 2018, by celebrities in response to the Harvey Weinstein scandal


What We Are Reading Today: Millions, Billions, Zillions by Brian W. Kernighan

Updated 19 October 2018
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What We Are Reading Today: Millions, Billions, Zillions by Brian W. Kernighan

  • Numbers are often intimidating, confusing, and even deliberately deceptive
  • Misunderstanding numbers can have serious consequences

Numbers are often intimidating, confusing, and even deliberately deceptive— especially when they are really big. The media loves to report on millions, billions, and trillions, but frequently makes basic mistakes or presents such numbers in misleading ways. 

And misunderstanding numbers can have serious consequences, since they can deceive us in many of our most important decisions, including how to vote, what to buy, and whether to make a financial investment. In this short, accessible, enlightening, and entertaining book, leading computer scientist Brian Kernighan teaches anyone — even diehard math-phobes — how to demystify the numbers that assault us every day.

With examples drawn from a rich variety of sources, including journalism, advertising, and politics, Kernighan demonstrates how numbers can mislead and misrepresent. In chapters covering big numbers, units, dimensions, and more, he lays bare everything from deceptive graphs to speciously precise numbers. And he shows how anyone — using a few basic ideas and lots of shortcuts — can easily learn to recognize common mistakes, determine whether numbers are credible, and make their own sensible estimates when needed.

Giving you the simple tools you need to avoid being fooled by dubious numbers, Millions, Billions, Zillions is an essential survival guide for a world drowning in big — and often bad — data.

Brian W. Kernighan is professor of computer science at Princeton University. His many books include Understanding the Digital World: What You Need to Know about Computers, the Internet, Privacy, and Security (Princeton). He lives in Princeton, New Jersey.