Britain First’s Jayda Fransen was ‘aggressive’ to Muslims, accused them of being rapists

Jayda Fransen is standing trial alongside the leader of the far-right group, Paul Golding. The pair are accused of religiously-aggravated harassment. They deny the charges. (AFP)
Updated 29 January 2018
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Britain First’s Jayda Fransen was ‘aggressive’ to Muslims, accused them of being rapists

LONDON: A Muslim man has described the deputy leader of Britain First Jayda Fransen as “aggressive” and accused her of calling Muslims “rapists,” a court in the UK has heard.
Fransen is standing trial alongside the leader of the far-right group, Paul Golding, accused of religiously-aggravated harassment, the Evening Standard reported. The pair deny the allegations.
Fransen and Golding were arrested in May last year as part of an investigation into the distribution of leaflets and online videos posted during a trial of three Muslim men and a teenager who were convicted of rape.
Video footage entitled “Muslim rapists 2” was played, which showed Faiz Rahmani standing with his brother Tamin Rahmani, who was one of the defendants, and his barrister outside the door to Canterbury Crown Court in southern England.
Faiz Rahmani is seen smoking a cigarette as Fransen walks up, steps toward them and starts questioning them.
In the video, Fransen can be heard asking: “Are you Muslim? What are you doing here? What are you in for?”
She also questioned them about Muslim men who were standing trial for “raping British kids,” the court heard.
In another video shown to the court, Fransen questions Rahmani about the “Muslim grooming scandal” and asks him: “Do you know about Rotherham?”
Asked why he was content to talk to Fransen, Rahmani said he did not know her and he did not want an argument with her but he wanted to address what she was saying. Rahmani told the court: “She was so aggressive, and so loud.”


US Secretary of State Pompeo makes unannounced visit to Kabul

Updated 25 June 2019
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US Secretary of State Pompeo makes unannounced visit to Kabul

  • Pompeo met Afghan President Ashraf Ghani during an unannounced visit to Kabul to discuss ongoing peace talks with the Taliban
  • Pompeo stopped over on his way to New Delhi for meetings with Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi and other officials

KABUL: US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo met Afghan President Ashraf Ghani during an unannounced visit to Kabul on Tuesday to discuss ongoing peace talks with the Taliban and the security situation ahead of Afghan presidential polls in September.
Pompeo stopped over on his way to New Delhi for meetings with Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi and other officials.
“With so much going on in the world right now it’s sometimes easy to forget about America’s commitment here to Afghanistan, but the world should know that the Trump administration has not forgotten, the American people have not forgotten,” Pompeo said in Kabul.
His visit to Afghanistan comes ahead of a seventh round of peace talks between Taliban leaders and US officials aimed at finding a political settlement to end the 18-year-old war in Afghanistan. The next round of peace talks is scheduled to begin on June 29 in Doha.
The talks between the United States and the Taliban will focus on working out a timeline for the withdrawal of US-led troops from Afghanistan and on a Taliban guarantee that militants will not plot attacks from Afghan soil.
“While we’ve made clear to the Taliban that were prepared to remove our forces, I want to be clear, we’ve not yet agreed on a timeline to do so,” said Pompeo.
“We agree that peace is our highest priority and that Afghanistan must never again serve as a platform for international terrorism.”
He said the two sides are nearly ready to conclude a draft text outlining the Taliban’s commitment to join fellow Afghans in ensuring that Afghan soil never again becomes a safe haven for “terrorists.”
Momentum for talks with the Taliban is steadily building, with a special US peace envoy for Afghanistan, Zalmay Khalilzad, pushing the peace process and insurgent leaders showing serious interest in negotiating for the first time. Ghani has also offered repeatedly to talk with the Taliban but they have insisted that they will not deal directly with the Ghani government.
“All sides agree that finalizing a US-Taliban understanding on terrorism and foreign troop presence will open the door to intra-Afghan dialogue and negotiation,” Pompeo said, adding that next step is at the heart of the US effort.
“We are not and will not negotiate with the Taliban on behalf of the government or people of Afghanistan.”